November 18th, 2019

We are thrilled to announce that Wednesday, November 20th has been named #CoritaDayinLA. The honor falls on what would have been Corita Kent’s 101st birthday. Throughout Corita’s 100th year, we have ramped up our efforts to grow Corita’s legacy and introduce her to a new generation, both in Los Angeles and around the world. In that spirit, we want to honor her on Corita Day with an online celebration—or in 1960s terms, “a happening”—that will share her art and message of hope, love, and justice with an even wider audience.

If you aren’t yet familiar with Corita, we hope you celebrate Corita Day by getting to know this inspiring artist and educator: read her bio, follow us on Instagram or Facebook, or sign up for our newsletter!

If you are already well acquainted, we hope you will join our online “happening” and share Corita’s artwork, story, or teachings via social media on November 20th. We invite you to create your own artwork if you desire, but we also have a few sample posts here. Thank you for being a part of Corita’s legacy!


November 6th, 2019

Corita Art Center and CHIRLA, the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, partnered to build an altar titled Corita Art Center x CHIRLA: amar la justicia for this year’s Dia de los Muertos celebration at Hollywood Forever cemetery. The altar honored members of the extended CHIRLA family lost in the struggle for immigrant rights.

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Corita used bold and graphic serigraphs to expose injustice around the world while delivering a message of love, hope, and justice. In this spirit, the altar was constructed out of one of Corita’s favorite everyday items, the cardboard box, and featured an enlarged version of love justice, a serigraph she first created in 1966 which boldly depicts the Camus quote, “I should like to be able to love my country and still love justice,” in red, white, and blue. 


September 13th, 2019

For Corita, celebration was an art form. All celebrations contained variations on the same ingredients: special colors, words, clothes, processions, etc. Corita analyzed celebrations in this way in order to update and revitalize traditions. In August 2019, the Corita Art Center went to CicLAvia: Meet the Hollywoods to identify some of the ingredients of a celebration.


August 28th, 2019

plork, n. \ plôrk \ 1. : a portmanteau created by Corita Kent, combining the words “play” and “work.”

We are mastering “plork” over at the Corita Art Center instagram page. Don’t miss out on the fun. Click through to follow us. 


August 14th, 2019

For the anniversary of the Watts Rebellion, we take an in depth look at Corita’s “my people,” from 1965.


August 1st, 2019

We found this great clipping from an interview with Corita in The New Yorker from 1966. May we all be blessed with Corita’s prolific productivity in the coming month. Don’t forget Rule # 7: The only rule is work!


July 23rd, 2019

Introducing our “From the Archives” series, where we take a peek inside the archives at the Corita Art Center to share a lesser-known piece by Corita Kent.

 This first installment features Olivian Cha, our Curator and Collections Manager, uncovering a poster commissioned by the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 for their March on Washington. Olivian notes Corita’s frequent use of newspaper clippings in her work, and how it illustrates her understanding of the media’s growing impact on society.


June 4th, 2018

Save the date!🗓#Corita100 Celebration❗️🎈🎉💜
Saturday November 10, 2018
Blessed Sacrament School Auditorium
6441 Sunset Blvd
Hollywood
#coritakent


January 17th, 2018

Happy #MuseumSelfieDay! Corita and Sr. Magdalen Mary in Paris, 1959. #fromthearchives #coritakent #mirrorselfie #nunshavingfun


January 12th, 2018

The right light really makes meatballs sing! (at Corita Art Center)